A personal record of what's going on in my Northern Michigan zone 4 gardens. I use raised beds and grow organically. Nothing fancy--just trying to garden with nature in mind.

Tuesday, September 1, 2015

August Garden Update--Part 2 and the End of the Month Roundup


Green Beans going to seed, Corn, Sunflowers and Tomatoes

August 17-- .65" rain

August 18--  .65" rain

August 19-20--  .25" rain
August 20  The Cauliflower that "Got Away"---didn't check it for a week. Ooops.

 August 20     Pulled the broccoli in both beds, topped each bed with a wheelbarrow full of                                      "doo - Found 3 more stray potato plants in those beds yielding another 15                                          pounds Yukons
                   Harvested the rest of the corn. Seven ears eaten for lunch, the rest put into storage.
                       Total corn harvest: 20 ears eaten fresh, 20 ears cut/blanched/and in the freezer
                   Running dangerously low on Mokum carrots--only a few more days worth. Yikes!

August 22--Pulled both Broccoli beds
                 Dug one bed of the Yukon Gems---yield 35 pounds--perfect-no scab or flaws at all
Broccoli Beds (on left) cleared and manured and one bed Yukon Golds dug
Pumpkins starting to "color up"


August 23---Rain  .70"

August 24---Rain  . 10"   Daytime high 61 degrees. YES!!!!

August 25--Rain   .2 "     Daytime high--57 degrees---DOUBLE YES!!!

August 28--  Rain   .3"
                   Dug a few Red Pontiacs. Somethings wrong--really wrong
                   The picture doesn't show it too clearly but they are like "unfurling" flowers.
                   It must have been the seed potatoes--I grew them as I always do. The texture is
                   extremely woody and they are light as balsa wood. NOT like Pontiacs at all!
All the Red Pontiacs are turning out grossly misshapen.  NO IDEA what is wrong
August 29--Dug a second bed of Yukon Gems--all perfect--roughly 30 pounds

Also picked the LAST of the Mokum Carrots---a sad day for us. We'll miss their crunchy sweet 
goodness!!  Next year I need two full beds of them.  

Elsewhere around the yard:
West Side of House

North Side of House
Agastache, Cleome, and Joe Pye are bringing in the bees on the East side of the House
Total Rainfall for the month --5.15"---about double the normal amount.
Coolest day---August 25-High temp of only 56 degrees
Hottest Day--August 14--High temp 89 degrees (blech!)

So far, no tomatoes---just a handful or two of cherry toms.
The Brandywines are loaded and the size is HUGE, but nothing is even thinking of ripening.

The onions are starting to look ratty, so hopefully next week they will be ready to be pulled.


Water tanks were drained on the last day of the month.  September is our "wet" month, and the garden is just about done anyway. I'm just waiting for that first frost, which typically is the 10th of September.   I'll do an update Mid-September and then the Winners and Losers post.

Hope you all have a terrific week in the garden!

40 comments:

  1. I am envious of your potato harvest!! You'll be eating well for a while. :-) Not much going on in our garden anymore and I still haven't decided if I want to plant some fall crops... Frost on the 10th of September, yikes. I am ready for cooler weather and less humidity, but not frost.

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    1. Anke-hello---You simply must put in a fall garden. Oh my, I can't imagine being lucky enough to have time to grow this fall and not doing it. Besides--I NEED to see your tidy garden growing!!!
      :)

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  2. Every now and then I'll get a misshapen potato like you've shown. If you find out why that happens, let me know.

    In the picture of the north side of the house, is that a grape arbor out in the yard? We've always talked about starting grapes here, but have not done so yet because of the short growing season and thinking they might not make it over winter.

    Expected frost on September 10th? Yikes! The past several years we've been going into October before a hard killing frost. (Did I just jinx it for this year??)

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    1. Hi Mama Pea---yes, that is a grape arbor--I am unsure of the variety but we always manage to get grapes in early September. I'll pick them on the 10th and store them in the fridge.

      And yes, we always have frost that early, and aside from the tomatoes, I'm GLAD. That means it's time for ME. Oh, and Don says "time for him"!!
      :D

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  3. Sue, we had a wet year here in Nebraska as well. The weeds won in half the garden. I'm struggling to win the war. August brought almost nine inches of rain. My garden soil will stay wet and sticky for at least two days after a rain. Well, it was almost time for the next rain by then. I've really had a time with gardening this year. Some things like cucumbers, green beans, green peppers, and now tomatoes have done well. The potatoes and onions are still in the ground but look good so far. The biggest struggle was with the weeds and wildlife. The deer ate all the strawberries and the buds off the pumpkins and squash. The pesky raccoon took care of the entire sweet corn patch in a single night. I'm about 1 1/2 panels away from having the great garden wall finished which will keep the deer out. Next year the corn patch will be wrapped with chicken wire inside the six foot wooden fence and a portable electric fence will be around the the chicken wire fence. If the raccoon get through that, they deserve to have some. They know the difference between sweet corn and regular corn. My neighbor who has a garden just 30 feet away from my garden at Terra Nova Gardens planted decorative corn and the little buggers totally left that alone and devastated mine. Dirty rotten rascals. This is the fourth year without sweet corn. I'm not taking it any more and we will see who wins next year. Ok ok, deep breath. I'm better now. :-)

    Have a great day in the dwindling garden.

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    1. David--I want to see PHOTOS of that corn Fortress when it's all constructed. And if those buggers get past all that, well, I think it's time to give up on corn.
      If you want to try trapping the coons, they're suckers when it comes to marshmallows. Gets em every time. (I'm like that with Ben and Jerry's New York Super Fudge Chunk ice cream--Ha!)

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  4. I love prepping the beds for winter. By September, I'm ready to give the garden & myself a bit of a break and really enjoy the satisfaction of cleaning up and putting the beds to "bed", so to speak. I see so many familiar flowers in your borders (i.e. I have them but have no idea what they are) - one of these days, when I get to organizing my perennial beds, I'll have to pick your brain on that one.

    That's a shame about the Red Pontiacs, but it looks like you more than made up for it with the other varieties you grew - 15 lbs of Yukon Golds from a few "stray" plants is pretty awesome!

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    1. Hi Margaret--I'd LOVE to compare notes on the flowers. I believe that's what the long days of winter are for---and I love it!

      Yep--I have LOTS of taters....................and still now Brandywine. SOB!

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  5. Sue, your garden looks as beautiful as ever, as do the Yukon gold! And that cauliflower may have gotten a little away, but soup would be on my list.

    We finally got some rain over several days: less than 1/2 in, but will take anything we can get after 0 inches for over 3 months. Amazingly hot dry summer, but today I see cloud cover and dream of rain. ;)

    Have a great rest of the week.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Diana-so wonderful to hear you got SOME rain. Hopefully more shall be on the way. No rain for 3 months--I couldn't bear it.
      And that cauliflower made TWO large batches of soup---one for that day, one for the freezer!
      Hooray!

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  6. Just think of all the dishes waiting for those potatoes. A gal could live a long time on potatoes! Your flowers are so beautiful. I am always amazed at how stunning your garden is. Enjoy!

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    1. Thanks so much Daisy! And I sure hope you're back up to snuff soon!

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  7. Sue, your garden is so soothing and luscious! Thank you so much for sharing.

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  8. Hi Sue! Your garden and landscaping both look great. It still looks pretty green. I agree the potato harvest looks wonderful. We're starting the process of finishing up what garden we had this year, but I haven't started putting anything 'to bed' for the winter yet. We're hoping for better next year, but are thankful for what we did get this year.

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    1. Hi Mark--we've had a LOT of rain this year, so everything looks rather "fresh"...pretty unusual for us. Seems funny how fast the summer went--hard to believe we're almost done already. Bet your "helpers' are going to be right there for the fall cleanup---lots of pics, I hope!

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  9. As usual your blog fills me with a mixture of admiration and envy. The flowers look glorious! I have tried for years to get that classic late summer/early fall combination of rudbeckia and Russian sage going, but the deer keep eating the Rudbeckia.

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    1. Ien-I've battled those deer forever as well. I'm now protected behind a maze of chicken wire, deer netting, and hog panels. Ugly, but effective.
      Have a wonderful week

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  10. That potato shape is very strange. We haven't harvested any carrots yet. The first two sowings were devastated by slugs and the third hasn't produced harvesting sized carrots yet. You do get frosts early we would be very upset if we had a frost in September.

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    1. Hi Sue--I had trouble with my first batch of carrots being attacked by pill bugs. I guess it's always something! Best of luck on your carrot harvest....that's always a marvelous time.

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  11. Replies
    1. Hi Tonya--Well, I'm glad--welcome!

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  12. I really enjoy your garden updates. The seasonal differences between you are and we were are, are fascinating. Sorry about the Pontiac Reds. Mine did that too. But the Yukons are beauiful! Ours came out too small this year. They're still good and we'll have plenty of potatoes for the winter, but I'd hoped for better. We're busy planting fall crops now. Our first frost date is still about 45 days away.

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    1. 45 more days? Lettuce, spinach, radishes, oh my!! I'm envious! And yet, tired too!
      Have a good week, Bill

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  13. Hi Sue,
    I am amazed by all the veggies you can for the winter! I always wanted to do that, but never did. I am so envious!

    Your flower gardens look great. I especially like the West end photo. I have not had much time for the flower garden this year. I really miss it, but am so blessed to have a retired husband who has taken over that task while I work!

    Frost Sept. 10?? Wow! For me, it's sometimes Oct. 10, but rarely in Sept.

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    1. Hey Zoey--that's what I get for moving to the center of the state---no bodies of water to keep us warm for longer.
      We're in the same boat having retired husbands, but mine isn't allowed to "mess" with my flowers!!
      :D

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  14. Hi Sue,
    I have been spending too much time on Facebook, and not getting many blogs read. I'm glad I made it here to see your latest harvests. I need to plant more carrots, too, next year. I did just get some from the farmer's market, complete with dirt on them. I'm sorry the one kind of potatoes did not turn out right. It's good you planted two kinds. We have dug up one row of potatoes, but just got a few out of each hill. There is a walnut tree near by, and nothing does real well in that area, but I keep trying different things. Your flowers are looking great still! I don't like how short the days are becoming.

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    1. Hi Sue--I'm so happy you stopped! I had a place back in Illinois that had 4 large Walnut trees in the yard and I couldn't get anything but grass to grow there. And the mess in fall---ACK! Wheelbarrows FULL of those little "whips" and the nuts were always rotten. It was a mess.
      Hope you have a wonderful fall

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  15. Its all looking good. Maybe if I'd been half as organized as you my veggie gardening story would have turned out better....;)

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    1. Yes-but then you wouldn't have time for all the adventures (and mischief!) you and Mrs. T get in to!!
      :)

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  16. Your garden looks very nice- much neater than mine

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    1. Thanks so much, John. I appreciate the visit! Have fun on your hikes

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  17. I just found your blog and look forward to reading more. Wow, you have a beautiful garden!

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  18. Hello. Sorry it's been so long since I visited. The flowers are sure happy at your place. Your Sep has been wet. Ours has been hot and dry. Like August finally got to us. Those carrots are beautiful. Weird on the potatoes. Pumpkins!!! Bummer on the tomatoes. If we could, I'd do some swapping with you. Glad I checked in. Happy harvesting!

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  19. Wow! You do it right! A lot of hard work = beauty and good eats! :-) Love the sunflowers too!

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  20. By the way, did you know that "Mokum" is the Yiddish nickname for my beloved city of origin, Amsterdam?

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  21. I can only dream of a potato harvest like that. Hope you are feeling better soon but glad you had a good holiday.

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  22. I just happened on your blog today and I am really enjoying it! I order from Fedco too and I'll have to make a note of those Mokum carrots to try next year. The kinds we tried this year weren't particularly sweet.

    Your flower beds are gorgeous! I really like the color combinations set against the stone of the house.

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  23. Hi Sue, I didn't see a place to leave a comment on your more recent post. Happy anniversary! The place you were in the photo sure looks scenic! I hope you are feeling better soon. Thanks for your comment on my Wildflower Wednesday post.

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